WELCOME TO THE YOGA AND JUDAISM CENTER

The primary focus of this yoga is not on physical exercise, but is rather "yoga beyond the mat," focusing on meditation, mysticism, philosophy and psychology.
Likewise, the focus on Judaism here is on "Hebrew Spirituality", the spirituality within Judaism, not the religion.
Your comments and posts are welcome.

An Interspiritual Journey
Find Your Inspiration and Follow It

Rabbi Yoel Glick Shabbaton February 27, 28, March 1


See details below under "Current Teaching Sessions"


Donate here:














CURRENT TEACHING SESSIONS


UPCOMING IN JANUARY AND FEBRUARY - SAVE THE DATES!!!


JEWISH YOGA MEDITATION AND MYSTICISM. The great spiritual traditions of both East and West have throughout the ages promoted various forms of meditation as important practices to foster spiritual awakening and development. As an independent practice, to supplement other spiritual or religious practices, for stress management and relaxation, or all of the above, this course will provide the theoretical framework and practical technique for a traditional yoga-based practice derived from an ancient and time-honored Himalayan tradition. Included will be basic breathing and stress reduction techniques. They lay the foundation for access to avenues leading to the stillness within. Connections will also be made throughout to similar principles found in Jewish mysticism, including utilizing Hebrew phrases in place of yoga mantras. The class consists of 4 two-hour sessions meeting once a week for 4 consecutive weeks.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR. Steven J. Gold, BA Antioch College, Philosophy and Religion; JD Emory Law School, is the founder/director of the Yoga and Judaism Center in Atlanta, GA and the author of Yoga and Judaism (2007) Ivri: The Essence of Hebrew Spirituality (2010), Torah Portion Summaries; With Insights from the Perspective of a Jewish Yogi (2010), and Basic Spiritual Principles (2011). He has been an initiate, student, practitioner and teacher in a Himalayan meditation tradition for over 35 years and a student of Kabala and Jewish Spirituality for several years. He developed a hybrid Jewish Yoga Meditation which is the focus of these sessions.


Cost: $60.00 for the 4-session course, or whatever can be comfortably afforded (nobody turned away for inability to pay); we are looking for participants willing to commit for all of the sessions because they are cumulative in nature, although missing one session is not fatal.


Dates and Times: Sunday mornings, 11 AM to 1 PM; January 25,

February 1, February 8, and February 15, 2015


Location: The home of Steve Gold, 3562 Castlehill Court, Tucker, GA 30084


* * *

Yoga, Breath, Chanting and Meditation Mini-Retreat

Sponsored by Neshama Interfaith Center


Steve Gold will facilitate this mini-retreat on Saturday, February 7, 2015. It will include physical exercise, breathing and relaxation, chanting and guided meditation.


Date: Saturday, February 7, 2015

Time: Session 1, 10 AM to Noon; Session 2, 1 PM to 3:00 PM; Break for bag lunch between sessions, Noon to 1 PM

Location: Sandy Springs Christian Church, 301 Johnson Ferry Road NW, Sandy Springs, GA 30328

Fee: $20.00 each for individual sessions, $30.00 for both sessions


Session 1: Yoga Body-Breath-Mind-Spirit Practices

10 AM to Noon


Yoga is most popularly known as a system of physical exercise developed in India to tone, balance and calm the body and internal organs. It is also part of a more comprehensive system designed to facilitate spiritual development through progressive steps of a journey from without to within. It leads from the body to the breath to the mind and ultimately to the spirit. Chanting is also a spiritually beneficial practice within the yoga system channeling emotions in a uplifting direction.


This session will begin with physical exercises, followed by breathing and relaxation exercises, followed by chanting, and ending with a guided meditation. Bring a yoga mat, a blanket or pillow for seated meditation and chanting (chairs will be provided for those who are not comfortable sitting on the floor).


It is recommended that participants come to the class on an empty stomach, or if you must eat, finish a light breakfast at least one hour before the start of the class session. Yoga and meditation is best done on an empty stomach.




Break for ‘Bring your own’ bag lunch between sessions, Noon to 1 PM

Session 2: Science of Breath and Pranayama – Theory and Practice

1 PM to 3 PM


Yoga emphasizes the significance of the breath and its associated, more subtle life force, called “prana”. This tandem serves as a significant layer of the soul and physiological and spiritual function that connects the body with the deeper levels of lower and higher mind, and beyond. This session will start with an in-depth theoretical presentation exploring the physiological functions of the breath and corresponding psychic functions of the flow of life force prana. It will conclude with a detailed experiential meditation exercise putting the theory into practice.


About the facilitator: Steven J. Gold, BA Antioch College, Philosophy and Religion; JD Emory Law School, is the founder/director of the Yoga and Judaism Center in Atlanta, GA and the author of Yoga and Judaism (2007), Ivri: The Essence of Hebrew Spirituality (2010), Torah Portion Summaries; With Insights from the Perspective of a Jewish Yogi (2010), and Basic Spiritual Principles (2011). He has been an initiate, student, practitioner and teacher in a Himalayan yoga and meditation tradition for over 35 years and a student of Kabala and Jewish Spirituality for several years. His teaching activities include yoga and meditation as contained in Indian spirituality, Jewish mysticism, and correlations between the two traditions. Blog: http://yajcenter.blogspot.com. Email: yajcenter@aol.com.


To register for one or both sessions (please confirm which you are interested in joining, if only one), please email Sue at sue@neshamainterfaithcenter.org.

Payment on the day by cash or check, payable to Steve Gold www.neshamainterfaithcenter.org


* * *











Daat Elyon presents:


Living in the Presence of God

A Contemplative Shabbaton

With Rabbi Yoel Glick

February 27, 28, March 1, 2015

Atlanta, GA


Come join us for a Shabbaton with the renowned teacher, spiritual guide and mentor Rabbi Yoel Glick. During this weekend, Rabbi Yoel will share insights, practices and experiences from his new book Living the Life of Jewish Meditation: A Comprehensive Guide to Practice and Experience.


Friday night, February 27: Contemplative Kabbalat Shabbat

Friday Night, Rabbi Yoel Glick will lead a contemplative Kabbalat Shabbat service to greet the Sabbath Queen with short guided meditations, chanting and singing.

Time: 7:30 PM

Location: Ahavath Achim Synagogue, 600 Peachtree Battle Ave. NW, Atlanta 30327


Saturday Morning, February 28, Meditation Workshop: Building a Jewish Meditation Practice

At the heart of the meditative life is our daily practice. Our day-to-day meditation is the key to transforming our consciousness. In this workshop, we will explore the five categories of meditation techniques - stilling the mind, visualization, concentration, mantra chanting and contemplation - and delve into the inner processes that they set into motion.

Time: 10 AM to 1 PM

Location: Lang Carson Center (at Lang Carson Park), 100 Flat Shoals Ave SE, Atlanta, 30316

Fee: $20.00. Pre-registration/prepayment required. Send fee payable to Yoga and Judaism Center, PO Box 1769, Decatur, GA 30031. Space is limited; first-come, first-served. Bring yoga mat, meditation blanket/cushion.


Saturday Evening, February 28: Celebratory Havdalah

In this Havdalah service, Rabbi Yoel will utilize the traditional rituals, Kabbalistic chanting, Hasidic melodies and mystical teaching to conclude the Shabbat and draw its spiritual power into the consciousness of the new week.

Time: 7 PM to 8 PM

Location: Vista Yoga, 2836 LaVista Rd., Decatur 30033 (behind Napoleon’s)


Sunday Morning, March 1: Seeking the Living Presence of God: The Story of My Spiritual Journey

In this talk, Rabbi Yoel will talk about his spiritual journey and the vibrant encounter between Judaism and Hinduism which has become his life’s path and work.

Time: 11 AM (silent meditation from 10:30 AM to 11 AM; program starts at 11AM)

Location: Vedanta Center of Atlanta, 2331 Brockett Rd. Tucker, GA 30084


Sunday Afternoon, March 1: Building the Temple of the Heart: The Three Pillars of the Spiritual Life

In the Hebrew Bible, God commands Israel: “Make me a sanctuary and I shall dwell in your midst.” The Baal Shem teaches that each of us is a living temple.

The rabbis set out the three pillars of this inner temple: Torah (study of spiritual wisdom), Avodah (Worship) and Gimilut Hasadim (Acts of Loving-kindness). These three pillars correspond to the three Yogas of Hinduism: Jnana yoga, Bhakti yoga, and Karma yoga. They can also be defined as the expansion of our consciousness, the constant remembrance of God, and the inner work of self-transformation. In this talk and experiential workshop, we will explore how to use these three paths to build a sacred space inside us where the Divine Presence dwells.

Time: 1 PM to 3 PM

Location: Vedanta Center of Atlanta, 2331 Brockett Rd. Tucker, GA 30084



For more information, contact Steve Gold, Yoga and Judaism Center, yajcenter@aol.com, 770-270-8290.

All sessions are free and open to the public, except for Saturday morning, as noted. Donations are welcome to help cover costs.










Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Rabbi Yoel Glick Shabbaton


In Partnership with Limmud Atlanta + SE
 
Daat Elyon presents:
Living in the Presence of God
A Contemplative Shabbaton
with Rabbi Yoel Glick
Atlanta, GA

February 27, 28, March 1,2015

Come join us for a Shabbaton with the renowned teacher, spiritual guide and mentor Rabbi Yoel Glick. During this weekend, Rabbi Yoel will share insights, practices and experiences from his new book Living the Life of Jewish Meditation: A Comprehensive Guide to Practice and Experience.

Friday Night, February 27 – Contemplative Kabbalat Shabbat
Rabbi Yoel Glick will lead a contemplative Kabbalat Shabbat service to greet the Sabbath Queen with short guided meditations, chanting and singing.
Time: 7:30 PM
Location: Ahavath Achim Synagogue, 600 Peachtree Battle Ave. NW, Atlanta 30327

Saturday Morning, February 28 – Meditation Workshop: Building a Jewish Meditation Practice
At the heart of the meditative life is our daily practice. Our day-to-day meditation is the key to transforming our consciousness. In this workshop, we will explore the five categories of meditation techniques – stilling the mind, visualization, concentration, mantra chanting and contemplation – and delve into the inner processes that they set in motion.
Time: 10 AM to 1 PM
Location: Lang Carson Center (at Lang Carson Park), 100 Flat Shoals Ave SE, Atlanta 30316
Fee: $20.00. Pre-registration/prepayment required. Send fee payable to Yoga and Judaism Center, PO Box 1769, Decatur, GA 30031. Space is limited; first-come, first-served. Bring yoga mat, meditation blanket/cushion.

Saturday Evening, February 28 – Celebratory Havdalah
In this Havdalah service, Rabbi Yoel will utilize the traditional rituals, Kabbalistic chanting, Hasidic melodies and mystical teaching to conclude the Shabbat and draw its spiritual power into the consciousness of the new week.
Time: 7 PM to 8 PM
Location: Vista Yoga, 2836 LaVista Rd., Decatur 30033 (behind Napoleon’s)

Sunday Morning, March 1 – Seeking the Living Presence of God: The Story of My Spiritual Journey
In this talk, Rabbi Yoel will talk about his spiritual journey and the vibrant encounter between Judaism and Hinduism which has become his life’s path and work.
Time: 11 AM (silent meditation from 10:30 AM to 11 AM; program starts at 11 AM)
Location: Vedanta Center of Atlanta, 2331 Brockett Rd. Tucker, GA 30084

Sunday Afternoon, March 1  - Building the Temple of the Heart: The Three Pillars of the Spiritual Life
In the Hebrew Bible, God commands Israel: “Make me a sanctuary and I shall dwell in your midst.” The Baal Shem teaches that each of us is a living temple. The rabbis set out the three pillars of this inner Temple: Torah (study of spiritual wisdom), Avodah (Worship) and Gimilut Hasadim (Acts of Loving-kindness). These three pillars correspond to the three Yogas of Hinduism: Jnana yoga, Bhakti yoga, and Karma yoga. They can also be defined as the expansion of our consciousness, the constant remembrance of God, and the inner work of self-transformation. In this talk and experiential workshop, we will explore how to use these three paths to build a sacred space inside us where the Divine Presence dwells.
Time: 1 PM to 3 PM
Location: Vedanta Center of Atlanta, 2331 Brockett Rd. Tucker, GA 30084

For more information, contact Steve Gold, Yoga and Judaism Center, yajcenter@aol.com, 770-270-8290.
All sessions are free and open to the public, except for Saturday morning, as noted. Donations are welcome to help cover costs. To donate, go to yajcenter.blogspot.com.


Thursday, January 15, 2015

Quote of the Week 312 - The World's Breathing


The world’s continual breathing is what we hear and call silence.

-- Clarice Lispector

Sunday, January 11, 2015

Quote of the Week 311 - My Peace


I thrive on the eccentricity of my imagination. Outwardly, I’m conventional and boring. Inwardly, I can’t keep the wild thoughts from flowing. That’s my peace. In that wildness lives my creative and comforting stillness.

--Thomas Moore, in the article “The Place Beyond Seeking”, Spirituality & Health magazine, January/February 2015 issue

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Quote of the Week 310 - Essence is More Than the Sum of the Parts

-->
A biological organism is something more than the sum of its parts. Consider the people you know. If you analyze them according to height, weight, age, where they went to school, and so on, you are engaging in a form of reductionism that will never capture their essence. We intuitively understand this to be true with human beings, but we have been trained not to apply it to every other substance and life-form and the planet.

--Herbalist Stephen Harrod Buhner in an interview by Akshay Ahuja in Sun Magazine, December 2014, Issue 468

Thursday, December 4, 2014

Quote of the Week 309 - With Your Light


Con tu luz, si se puede.
With your light, it can be done.

--Carlos Santana

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Quote of the Week 308 - The Void


During deep sleep, there is the experience of the void; the same void can be experienced during meditation. That void is not empty, but there is a feeling of emptiness. During that time, there is no content, and that is why it is called deep sleep. So sleep is an unconscious state without content; there is no awareness. When one is in the void, he does not know that he is in the void, but once awake, he remembers being in the void. In deep meditation, one is in the void and is aware of it at the time. The meditative state is a fully awakened state.

--Swami Rama, Mandukya Upanishad, Enlightenment Without God, p. 98; OM, The Eternal Witness, Secrets of the Mandukya Upanishad, p. 161

Friday, November 14, 2014

Quotes of the Week 307 - Light of Different Grades/A Luminous Perspective


Quotes of the Week 307 – Light of Different Grades/A Luminous Perspective

Light of Different Grades

The soul is light, the mind is light, and the body is light – light of different grades; it is this relation which connects man with the planets and stars.

--Hazrat Inayat Khan


A Luminous Perspective

The perception that dawns on a person to see the world, not as finished, but as in the process of continued becoming, ascending, developing - this changes us from being ‘under the sun’ to being ‘above the sun’ from the place where everything takes on new form. The joy of heaven and earth abide in us as on the day they were created.

In this luminous perspective one looks at all the worlds, at the general and human development, at the destiny of each creature, at all the events of all times.

--Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook


Sunday, November 9, 2014

New Audio Now Available - Elijah the Prophet (and Enoch, Phinehas, Elisha and the Archangels Metatron and Sandalphon)

A new audio, "Elijah the Prophet (and Enoch, Phinehas, Elisha and the Archangels Metatron and Sandalphon)" is now available. You can click on the link below or go to the audio section in the right hand column of this blog (scroll down). It is a talk I gave at the Vedanta Center of Atlanta on Sunday, November 2. Enjoy. 
 
Elijah the Prophet

Monday, October 27, 2014

Elijah the Prophet Presentation Sunday, Nov. 2, 11 AM, Vedanta Center of Atlanta


I will be making the following presentation at the Vedanta Center of Atlanta on Sunday, November 2, 2014. The program begins with 30 minutes of meditation starting at 10:30 AM. My presentation will begin at 11 AM and last for one hour. There is a little meet and greet coffee session afterwards. The public is welcome, there is no charge (although donations are accepted, but no plate is passed around) and no reservations are needed. The Vedanta Center of Atlanta is located at 2331 Brockett Road, Tucker, GA 30084; 770-938-6673. It is at the corner of Adrian and Brockett, one block from LaVista.

Elijah the Prophet (and Enoch, Phinehas, Elisha and the Archangels Metatron and Sandalphon). Who was/is Elijah the Prophet, Eliyahu Hanavi, whose story is contained in the Jewish Bible? Where did he come from, what did he do, and where did he go? The Jewish Bible and supplemental sources weave an interesting story-line about Elijah and his co-horts/alter-egos/incarnations. Included are swashbuckling tales mixed with displays of extraordinary yogic-like powers and underlying mystical and spiritual lessons. Come hear about this hero/these heroes of old and ponder what his/their stories may mean for us today.

Date: November 2, 2014
Time: 11 AM (preceded by 30 minutes of meditation starting at 10:30 AM)
Location: Vedanta Center of Atlanta; 2331 Brocket Road, Tucker, GA 30084; 770-938-6673. (Corner of Adrian and Brockett, one block from LaVista.)
Cost: Free. Donations accepted, no reservations needed. Open to the public.

 

About the Presenter

Steven J. Gold, BA Antioch College, Philosophy and Religion; JD Emory Law School, is the founder/director of the Yoga and Judaism Center in Atlanta, GA. He has been a student, practitioner and teacher of spiritual self-realization and its related philosophy and psychology for over forty years, including yoga, Vedanta, kabala and eastern and western mysticism. He is an initiate and practitioner in the Tradition of the Himalayan Masters, as propagated in the West by the late Sri Swami Rama of the Himalayas. He is the author of Yoga and Judaism, Explorations of a Jewish Yogi; IVRI, The Essence of Hebrew Spirituality, 21st Century Perspectives on an Ancient Tradition; Torah Portion Summaries, With Insights from the Perspective of a Jewish Yogi; Basic Spiritual Principles, Writings of the Dawn, The Spiritual Journey of a Baby-Boomer, and The Book About Always Being At Home (spiritual children’s book).

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Quote of the Week 306 - Myth and Mistaken Assumptions


It is tragic that religious fundamentalists, on the one hand; and atheists (including, in particular, Neo-Darwinian fundamentalists) on the other tend to see no further than the literal acceptance of the Bible. Hence they base their hostility to each other regarding religious belief on the mistaken assumption that this is the true and only interpretation.
 

Turning first to the Intuitive aspect: It is unfortunate that neither the Creationist nor the Atheist understands the true meaning of the word ‘Myth’. It has, too often, been mis-represented as ‘Falsehood’. However, in its spiritual meaning ‘Myth’ is a symbolic story or legend used in Scripture to present a moral or wisdom teaching, but; told in the form of language usually used to describe historical events. The correct understanding of Myth is important, for it stems from the archetypal consciousness of Mankind.

--Bill Heilbronn, from The Courage of Uncertainty; A Jewish View of the Continuing Evolution of Faith in the Fields of Religion and Science

Sunday, October 5, 2014

A Yom Kippur Inspiration About This World and Our Place In It


A Yom Kippur Inspiration About This World and Our Place In It

I took a morning walk this past Yom Kippur. I take a morning walk every day, but there was something special in the air this particular Yom Kippur morning. The day before, a storm had blown through in the early morning hours, dumping a good bit of rain before moving on around 11 AM. Clearing and sunshine rapidly replaced the grey skies of the storm, but a sharp decrease in temperature heralded in a reminder that Fall had arrived. On Yom Kippur morning, although the temperature remained the coolest since last winter, the skies were still blue and sunny, with widely scattered white clouds. A strong wind once again stirred, and the clouds were whisking across the sky at an unusually rapid pace. It was in this setting that I was taking my morning walk, and the following thoughts began to formulate in my mind, spurred on by a recent video I had seen depicting the activity of our solar system and galaxy as they course through the cosmos.

This world, this universe, this cosmos in which we find ourselves is an extremely complicated mechanism. Collectively, we have spent many lifetimes through the various disciplines of the arts, humanities and sciences exploring and examining this mechanism in attempts to better understand it, ourselves, our place in it, and to use it as a medium through which to express ourselves. These efforts, these expressions, are best served if we connect with the source, the foundation, the essence of it all, from which it all has arisen and continues to arise in constant process. There is a unifying source which is great, awesome, mysterious and simple. It can be accessed, and such access provides us with the broadest and best perspective from which to conduct our lives. To question or doubt our ability to access this source would be akin to questioning/doubting the ability of a fish to access the water in which it swims. We are all immersed in it, totally dependent upon it, and interdependently connected through it. Our explorations sometimes get us confused in the morass of the overwhelming detail and complexity of this mechanism through which we function. That is why it is important to establish, remember and retain contact with the perspective provided by connecting with the simplicity of the origin, of the essence. This perspective of simplicity is a great salve for our confusion. It is important, and even necessary, to conduct our explorations and engage in our expressions through the various avenues we have created. We possess an inherent impulse to do so; it is what supplies us with inspiration, meaning and purpose. Musicians, artists, poets, philosophers, scientists, mystics and people in all walks of life engage and express in a manner unique to their chosen path or field of endeavor. There is no end to such activity. However, it is equally important to establish and maintain connection with our essence, the origin of our activity. It provides us with stability, like an internal gyroscope, lest we wobble, spin out of control and become lost. This is the crux to finding ourselves and establishing the ability to lead productive, fulfilling, enjoyable and joyous lives.

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Quote of the Week 305 - God According to Yoga


Yoga tells us that God is as real as we ourselves. God is among us, is
in us, is us, and yet is beyond us. It has no beginning, no middle, and no end. God is eternal, all-pervading, and beyond death, decay, and destruction. It is the total sum of all that is. It is everything – knower, known, and the means of knowing. It is endowed with limitless unrestricted power of will, power of knowledge, and power of action. God is pure Being with the ability to become anything imaginable. It is one, with the ability to become many. It is transcendental, with the ability to become immanent. It is abstract, with the ability to become perceptible. It is beyond time, space, and the law of causality with the ability to become part of the world existing within the domain of time and space. We attain Samadhi by surrendering to this God.

--from The Secret of the Yoga Sutra, Samadhi Pada, by Pandit Rajmani Tigunait