WELCOME TO TORAH-VEDA

Torah and Veda are two ancient sources of spirituality still vibrant today. Torah is conveyed through the sacred language of Hebrew and Veda is conveyed through the sacred language of Sanskrit. The focus here is on meditation, mysticism, philosophy, psychology and the underlying spirituality that has been incorporated into religions, and not as much on the religions themselves. Your comments and posts are welcome.

Torah-Veda
An Interspiritual Journey
Find Your Inspiration and Follow It



Quote of the Week 320 - Scripture, Myth and Concentration on Spiritual Matters


Religion has attempted in the past to dogmatise on Cosmology. But wiser theologians always recognized that when Scripture tells us stories telling HOW creation happened, these must be understood as Myths, that is the attempt to describe a spiritual requirement in seemingly historical terms. For example, the creation myth about God making the world in six days and resting on the seventh is a way of teaching that Man, created in the image of God, needs to rest once a week from all earthly matters to concentrate on spiritual matters.


--Bill Heilbronn, from The Courage of Uncertainty; A Jewish View of the Continuing Evolution of Faith in the Fields of Religion and Science



CURRENT TEACHING SESSIONS


I will be making the following presentations at the Vedanta Center of Atlanta on Sunday, May 17, 2015. The morning program begins with 30 minutes of meditation starting at 10:30 AM. The morning presentation will begin at 11 AM and last for one hour. The afternoon session will run two hours, from 1:15 PM through 3:15 PM. There is a little meet and greet coffee session between the two sessions, and enough time to catch a quick bite to eat. The public is welcome, there is no charge for either session (although donations are accepted, but no plate is passed around) and no reservations are needed. The Vedanta Center of Atlanta is located at 2331 Brockett Road, Tucker, GA 30084; 770-938-6673. It is at the corner of Adrian and Brockett, one block from LaVista.


Morning Session


Abstraction, Form and Meditation. A good deal of spiritual and religious expression, like the paths of bhakti and karma, is engaged in exploring phenomena whereby spiritual realities are experienced as or through form and ritual. Another avenue of spiritual expression and experience focuses more on the abstract, the formless, like the paths of jnana and raja. This presentation will focus on the intersection between these various approaches, which are not mutually exclusive, and on meditation as a practice that can help access and heighten all of these expressions. Can the abstract, the intangible, the formless feel “real”? And what is the origin of all of these forms? Are they mere projections, fabrications of the human mind seeking to make concrete and comprehensible in more digestible pieces something that is difficult to grasp and comprehend? Or are they something more, expressions originating from other dimensions that we can access to provide us with inspiration and guidance?


Date: May 17, 2015

Time: 11 AM to Noon (preceded by 30 minutes of meditation starting at 10:30 AM)

Location: Vedanta Center of Atlanta; 2331 Brocket Road, Tucker, GA 30084; 770-938-6673. (Corner of Adrian and Brockett, one block from LaVista.)

Cost: Free. Donations accepted, no reservations needed. Open to the public.


Afternoon Session


A Foundation for a Fruitful Meditation Practice: Science of Breath/Pranayama/Relaxation – Theory and Practice


Some meditative traditions emphasizes the significance of the breath and its associated, more subtle life force, called “prana”. This tandem serves as a significant layer of the soul and physiological and spiritual function that connects the body with the deeper levels of lower and higher mind, and beyond. This session will start with an in-depth theoretical presentation exploring the physiological functions of the breath and corresponding internal subtle functions of the flow of life force prana. It will conclude with a detailed experiential relaxation/meditation exercise putting the theory into practice. These exercises provide a firm foundation for a fruitful meditation practice. This material will provide a “refresher” course for those who have taken a previous meditation class, but there are also some new elements incorporating more advanced and effective techniques. Beginners and experienced meditators may therefore both benefit.


Date: May 17, 2015

Time: 1:15 PM to 3:15 PM

Location: Vedanta Center of Atlanta; 2331 Brocket Road, Tucker, GA 30084; 770-938-6673. (Corner of Adrian and Brockett, one block from LaVista.)

Cost: Free. Donations accepted, no reservations needed. Open to the public.


About the Presenter


Steven J. Gold, BA Antioch College, Philosophy and Religion; JD Emory Law School, is the founder/director of Torah-Veda (fka the Yoga and Judaism Center) in Atlanta, GA. He has been a student, practitioner and teacher of spiritual self-realization and its related philosophy and psychology for over forty years, including yoga, Vedanta, kabala and eastern and western mysticism. He is an initiate and practitioner in the Tradition of the Himalayan Masters, as propagated in the West by the late Sri Swami Rama of the Himalayas. He is the author of Yoga and Judaism, Explorations of a Jewish Yogi; IVRI, The Essence of Hebrew Spirituality, 21st Century Perspectives on an Ancient Tradition; Torah Portion Summaries, With Insights from the Perspective of a Jewish Yogi; Basic Spiritual Principles; Writings of the Dawn, The Spiritual Journey of a Baby-Boomer; and The Book About Always Being At Home (spiritual children’s book).

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Quote of the Week 279 - Reasons to Go to Synagogue


That wonderful storyteller Harry Golden makes this point in one of his stories. When he was young, he once asked his father, “If you don’t believe in God, why do you go to synagogue so regularly?” His father answered, “Jews go to synagogue for all sorts of reasons. My friend Garfinkle, who is Orthodox, goes to talk to God. I go to talk to Garfinkle.”

--from When Bad Things Happen to Good People by Rabbi Harold S. Kushner

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