WELCOME TO TORAH-VEDA

Torah and Veda are two ancient sources of spirituality still vibrant today. Torah is conveyed through the sacred language of Hebrew and Veda is conveyed through the sacred language of Sanskrit. The focus here is on meditation, mysticism, philosophy, psychology and the underlying spirituality that has been incorporated into religions, and not as much on the religions themselves. Your comments and posts are welcome.

Torah-Veda
An Interspiritual Journey
Find Your Inspiration and Follow It



Quote of the Week 323 -Our Human Birthright


There will never be an end to this work of making things better, because it is our human birthright to make things worse and to make them better.


--Zoketsu Norman Fischer, “The Problem of Evil”, Shambhala Sun magazine, May 2015

CURRENT TEACHING SESSIONS



TISH-SATSANG JUNE 13


In the spirit of inter-spiritual adventure, you are invited to attend a Tish-Satsang gathering:


Date: Saturday, June 13, 2015

Time: 11 AM to 1 PM

RSVP by June 10 and I will respond with the location


While “tish” is a Yiddish word related to a table, its historic meaning relates to a communal gathering of the spiritually-inclined around a table. “Satsang” is a Sanskrit word with a similar connotation of a gathering for spiritual inspiration, “sat” meaning “spiritual truth” and “sang” coming from a root connoting community.


This is an opportunity for communal sharing with the goal of building a spiritual community. Each person is asked to share something meaningful with the group.


Format:


We will assemble in some semblance of a circle and begin with twenty minutes of silent meditation, so bring a meditation cushion, chair or blanket. Following the meditation period:


1) A hat containing numbers will be passed around, with each participant taking a number.


2) A facilitator will call out a number. The participant holding that number will “have the floor” for 30 seconds to 5 minutes to do anything legal, with the idea to share with the group something of a spiritual/inspiring nature, loosely and broadly defined. There are no limits on what the participant can do while they “have the floor”, and they can enlist participation by others. Examples: sing a song, lead a chant, drum (including inviting others to drum), play an instrument, play a cd, dance, read (poetry, fiction, non-fiction), tell a story, share a piece of art, deliver a dvar, enact a play, tell us about your week, roll a ball around, play duck-duck-goose or musical chairs, show and tell, do nothing, guide a meditation, etc.


3) When your number is called, you can “pass”, but the idea is to come willing to participate. Nothing much will happen if there are too many “passes”.


4) No-one is to interfere while somebody else has the floor, although, as described above, that person can enlist participation by others. Even if you might elect to pass when your number is called, you should come expecting that somebody else might seek your participation when their number is called.


5) After each period, there will be a short period for comments/discussion, followed by the next number being called.


Afterwards, there will be a potluck Shabbat lunch. Please bring something to share.


Bring whatever else you want, including musical instruments, drums/other percussion, books, art, etc.


Please RSVP to me by June 10, so we have some idea of how many people are coming.



Thursday, January 3, 2013

Quote of the Week 250 - The Creation of the World


The creation of the world did not take place once and for all time, but takes place every day.

--Samuel Beckett

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